ZEVS

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ZEVS
Zevs (born 1977) is an anonymous French street artist, best known for his trademark "liquidation" technique. He was an early and influential graffiti artist and active as a tagger in Paris in the 1990s. He is named after a regional train, Zeus, that almost ran him over one day he was down in the metro. Working with other French artists in the second half of the 1990s like André and Invader, Zevs has been among the prominent figures who pioneered the French street art scene.
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ZEVS Goldman Sachs Liquidated

Goldman Sachs Liquidated
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ZEVS Goldman Sachs Liquidated
Goldman Sachs Liquidated
Mixed Media  

ZEVS

ZEVS

ZEVS Biography

King of the Gods, Zevs is one of the most explicitly politicised artists on the scene right now.

Zevs combines a street art mentality with pop art techniques to comment on the enduring widespread influence of celebrities and corporations on contemporary culture. Like Paul Insect, he both highlights and subverts what is the very essence of our time.

Zevs' Liquidated Logo series is arguably the most direct and recognisable example of street art culture jamming. Through liquidation, the artist transforms seemingly solid images into unstable logos dripping from the canvas. Deformed Apple, Google and Gucci emblems reference the ubiquitous commercial and materialistic culture of the modern day. No matter how deconstructed the images seem, they are instantly recognizable. They endure but they are not indestructible.

Besides the Liquidation project, his trademark techniques include using steam cleaners to create images on dirty walls and using invisible ink to create paintings only visible under UV light. These invisible ink pieces include a portrait of the 9/11 hijackers in the room they stayed in the night before their fateful act.

Some of his most prominent career highlights to date include the high profile visual kidnapping of a billboard model in Berlin, his infamous arrest following the liquidation of the Chanel logo in Hong Kong and the Visual Violations series where he blurs the faces of Marilyn Monroe and Jim Morrison.

After many years of public activity his work has garnered considerable attention from France's "high art" establishment, blurring as it does the line between street pieces, conceptual art, and good old-fashioned angry vandalism.

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